Thu May 25 20:20:22 +08 2017  
SINGAPORE
GUM™
    Emergency Contraception
SINGAPORE GUM™
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis): Stop HIV infection within 3 days after unprotected sex.
HIV test: 20 minute rapid test to accurately detect HIV infection 28 days after unprotected sex.
STD testing: Full & comprehensive sexually transmitted disease testing.

Emergency Contraception | SINGAPORE GUM™

Summary

Emergency Contraception | SINGAPORE GUM™ @singaporegum_com: Emergency contraceptive / contraception (EC), Singapore. Private & confidential service.

Advertisement: Come to sunny Singapore to have your testing and treatment. Singapore Ministry of Health registered general practice (GP) clinic:
SHIM CLINIC
SINGAPORE GUM™
168 Bedok South Avenue 3 #01-473
Singapore 460168
Tel: (+65) 6446 7446
Fax: (+65) 6449 7446
24hr Answering Tel: (+65) 6333 5550
Web: www.shimclinic.com
Opening Hours
Monday to Friday: 9 am to 3 pm, 7 pm to 11 pm
Saturday & Sunday: 7 pm to 11 pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Last registration: one hour before closing time.
Walk-in clinic. Appointments not required.
Bring NRIC, Work Pass or Passport for registration.

Description

Contraceptive / Contraception / Birth control methods available are mostly for females, and they include:

Emergency contraceptive / Emergency contraception (EC) is useful in situations of contraceptive failure:

Emergency contraceptive pill / Emergency contraception pill / Morning-after pill / Day-after pill

Advice / points to note about taking emergency contraceptives:

  • The emergency contraceptive is more effective the sooner it is taken after sex.
    • Within 24 hours, it prevents 95% of pregnancies.
    • Between 24-48 hours, it prevents 85% of pregnancies.
    • Between 48-72 hours, it prevents 58% of pregnancies.
    • Up to 5 days after intercourse, it has progressively decreasing effectiveness.
  • It is recommended that it should not be used more than twice in a month.
  • Other methods of regular contraception are usually recommended: condom, oral contraceptive (OC), and contraceptive patch.
  • It may cause a temporary disruption in the rhythm of the regular menstrual cycle. But if the next menstrual cycle does not come, then a pregnancy test should be done.
  • In a few people, it may cause some of the following side effects:
    • Headache
    • Dysmenorrhoea
    • Nausea
Important points to note:
  • The morning-after / day-after emergency contraceptive is not available over the counter.
  • It is available only by prescription, after seeing a doctor.
  • Boyfriends cannot consult with the doctor on behalf of his girlfriend.
  • The girl herself must register to see the doctor.
  • The girl must be 16 years of age or older when the sex occurred.
  • Do not ask if we know of other clinics providing this medication. We are not a directory service.
  • It is in stock at this clinic, NOW!
References

Sexual risk (of HIV/STD/pregnancy), and what you can do before and after exposure.

Timeline HIV STD Pregnancy
Before exposure
Abstain from sex, Be faithful, or Condom use
Circumcision (males only)
Contraception (females only)
HIV PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) STD vaccine:
- Hepatitis vaccine
- HPV vaccine
STD / HIV exposure
Unsafe sex / unprotected sex:
No condom / Condom broke / Condom slip
0-72 hours HIV prevention
HIV PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) treatment
- Stop HIV infection after exposure.
STD testing.
If STD symptoms appear, then do STD treatment.
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.
Emergency contraception (females only)
2 weeks HIV DNA PCR test
1 month 20 minute rapid HIV test - SD Bioline HIV Ag/Ab Combo:
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
3 months 20 minute rapid HIV test - OraQuick®:
- Oral saliva or
- Fingerprick blood sampling.
Full & comprehensive STD testing
- Males: Do not urinate for at least 4 hours before arriving.
- Females: testing is more accurate when you are not menstruating.

References


Latest News

Maintaining rigor in research: Flaws in a recent study and a re-analysis of the relationship between state abortion laws and maternal mortality in Mexico
Wed, 17 Aug 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
A recent publication (Koch et al 2015) claimed that Mexican states with more restrictive abortion laws had lower levels of maternal mortality. Our objectives are to replicate the analysis, re-analyze the data, and offer a critique of the key flaws of the Koch study. (Source: Contraception)

Implications of Employer Coverage of Contraception: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Contraception Coverage Under an Employer Mandate
Mon, 15 Aug 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
Mandatory employer-based insurance coverage of contraception in the U.S. has been a controversial component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Prior research has examined the cost effectiveness of contraception in general; however, no studies have developed a formal decision-model in the context of the new ACA provisions. As such, this study aims to estimate the relative cost effectiveness of insurance coverage of contraception under employer-sponsored insurance coverage taking into consideration newer regulations allowing for religious exemptions. (Source: Contraception)

Clarification of contraceptive drug pharmacokinetics in obesity
Mon, 15 Aug 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
Related to concerns about the role of obesity in the efficacy of contraceptive drugs, a review of the literature was carried out in regard to the pharmacokinetics of ethinyl estradiol and various progestins given by various routes of administration. Most studies show that obese women exhibit modestly lower plasma concentrations of these drugs (circa 30%) when given the same doses as normal weight women. While the mechanism is uncertain, precedence in the literature suggests that this is due to body weight-related differences in metabolism rates. (Source: Contraception)

Effect of BMI and Body Weight on Pregnancy Rates with LNG as emergency contraception: analysis of four WHO HRP studies
Thu, 11 Aug 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
To estimate the effect of increased body weight and body mass index (BMI) on pregnancy rates with Levonorgestrel (LNG) 1.5mg used as emergency contraception. (Source: Contraception)

WHO medical eligibility criteria update
Sat, 06 Aug 2016 09:33:21 +0100 | Contraception
For more than 20 years, the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health, in collaboration with its network of international partners, has issued evidence-based guidance on the safety of various contraceptive methods for women and men with particular medical conditions or personal characteristics. This guidance, the medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use or MEC, offers national family planning programs a comprehensive set of recommendations on whether a woman or man is eligible or not to use a particular contraceptive method. (Source: Contraception)

Editorial Board
Sat, 06 Aug 2016 09:33:21 +0100 | Contraception
(Source: Contraception)

Contents
Sat, 06 Aug 2016 09:33:21 +0100 | Contraception
(Source: Contraception)

“It was as if society didn't want a woman to get an abortion”: a qualitative study in Istanbul, Turkey
Thu, 28 Jul 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
In 1983, abortion without restriction as to reason was legalized in Turkey. However, at an international conference in 2012, the Prime Minister condemned abortion and announced his intent to draft restrictive abortion legislation. As a result of public outcry and protests, the law was not enacted, but media reports suggest that barriers to abortion access have since worsened. (Source: Contraception)

North American Forum on Family Planning Scientific Abstracts Denver, CO, November 5 –7, 2016
Thu, 28 Jul 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
These scientific abstracts are scheduled for presentation at the North American Forum on Family Planning (the Forum), the combined annual meeting of the Society of Family Planning (SFP), Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. This year, 263 abstracts were submitted for consideration, of which 20 were selected for oral presentation, 121 were selected for poster presentation and an additional 26 were selected for publication. SFP functioned as the lead partner in the scientific abstract review, and the reviews were completed by the Forum's Scientific Committee, which was chaired by Stephanie Teal, M.D., M.P.H., and co-chaired by Eve Espey, M.D., M.P.H.; Sonya Borrero, M.D., M.S.; Lawrence Finer, Ph.D.; and Tina Raine-Bennett, M.D., ...

North American forum on family planning scientific abstracts Denver, Colorado, November 5 –7, 2016
Thu, 28 Jul 2016 22:00:00 +0100 | Contraception
(Source: Contraception)